I Want to Be a Better Generation

We all treasure the experience of Afrizo: the joyful melodies, the rich voices, the colorful personalities that create a vibrant African experience.  But Afrizo’s songs and voices are more than just entertainment—they tell an ever-evolving story about how Daystar University in Kenya is impacting the entire African continent, one student at a time.

Every Afrizo song has a deeper message waiting to be discovered. It's often a message that reflects Daystar's dedication to educating Christian servant leaders to impact Africa. Let’s look deeper at one of Afrizo’ songs and see how it exemplifies the mission of Daystar University.

Recent news headlines stare us in the face and make us ask, “What is the world coming to?” “How did things get this way?” and “How can we change it?” Afrizo’s song “Mbukilye”—meaning “Lift Me Up”—challenges its listeners to stand up and be the answers to these questions. Listen now:

 

Asyai maitu makulya twiva, twasyata?
(When our parents ask us where we are, what will we say?)
Syana syitu syakulya, twaiva, twasyata?
(When our children ask us where we were, what will we say?)
Give me strength Lord, I want to be a better generation

Mbukilye (lift me up)
Nguma isyoke kwaku (so that all glory goes to you)  

I don’t wanna be the one that says I wish I knew
I don’t wanna be the one that tells my children sorry, no
So hold my hand Lord, lead me on
Hold my hand Lord, show me the way
Give me strength Lord, I want to be a better generation
Give me wisdom, I want to be a better generation

Mbukilye (lift me up)
Nguma isyoke kwaku (so that all glory goes to you)
Mbathime (bless me Lord)
Nguma isyoke kwaku (so that all glory goes to you)

I will lift your name on high, that is my desire
Glory belongs to you.

Manasseh Shalom wrote the words and the music to this meaningful song. In his native tongue, known as “Kamba,” he is challenging us to consider questions not commonly asked by the news headlines.

  • When our parents ask us, “Where are you and your generation? What are you doing to better this world?”—How will we respond?
  • How about 20 years from now? When our children ask us, “Where were you and your generation when all those things were happening?”—What will we say?

Manasseh says, “This song is a call to this generation to rise up, speak the truth, and act with integrity so that we can prepare a way for future generations.”  The Afrizo singers are members of the 5,000 strong student body of Daystar University. Each singer is pursuing a degree that will equip them with practical skills while rooting them in a Biblical worldview. Each singer also has a dream that is larger than the degree itself. These dreams, coupled with practical training and education, uniquely position them to be the answers Africa needs to bring hope and transformation to future generations.

Afrizo singer Carol excitedly shares that her dream is to start a school for street children and orphans so that they too can understand their worth to God and their role in society.)

Afrizo singer Carol excitedly shares that her dream is to start a school for street children and orphans so that they too can understand their worth to God and their role in society.)

Daystar’s alumni—approximately 18,000 individuals—are trusting God, asking Him “to hold their hands” and “lead them on” to bring transformation to their generation and the ones to come. Some are teachers doing exactly that. They are teaching Biblical values and practical skills to Kenya’s youth, which position the entire nation for a better future.

One alumnus, Dr. Henry Kyeyune, graduated in 1990 with a degree in communications. He sought to impact his generation through broadcasted Christ-centered media and through his own servant-like character, and he did so through positions at Trans World Radio, the Kenya Broadcasting Corporation, and the Uganda Broadcasting Corporation. Dr. Kyeyune used his industry expertise and his passion for Christ to teach other young broadcasters at Daystar University for 12 years. He is dedicated to “helping students prepare to be those who communicate Christ effectively and creatively in diverse fields.”

"God placed a desire in my heart to train and equip other people, to have a positive, Godly impact on society.”

"God placed a desire in my heart to train and equip other people, to have a positive, Godly impact on society.”

Dr. Kyeyune recalls why he chose Daystar University: “What I really appreciate about Daystar—which is different from other institutions—is the Christian perspective it offers. Daystar has a philosophy of building servant-leaders for both the church and our communities. One of the things that we’ve had a problem with in Africa is having leadership with integrity. Daystar looks not only on the academic side but imparts values we need in our communities today.”

In Afrizo’s song “Mbukilye,” the parents and children of Daystar graduates hear an answer to their questions: “What are you and your generation doing to better this world?” “Where are you and your generation when all those things were happening?”  Daystar students and alumni are standing up and answering: “I am doing something to make this world a better place. I was actively participating in the transformation of Africa.”

They do so with humility so that “all glory goes to God.” When looking at the scope of Daystar’s alumni, we can see that God has answered the prayer sung in “Mbukilye.” It is a prayer to “lift me up” and “bless me, Lord.” God has done that by giving them favor in their jobs and using them to impact communities and generations.

Africa Rise: Songs from Daystar University's Afrizo

Every Afrizo song has a deeper message waiting to be discovered. It's often a message that reflects Daystar's dedication to educating Christian servant leaders to impact Africa. Let’s look deeper at one of Afrizo’ songs and see how it exemplifies the mission of Daystar University...